CANNABIS
personalized medicine

CONDITIONS THAT MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A MEDICAL MARIJUANA RECOMMENDATION INCLUDE:

· Cancer
· Epilepsy
· Glaucoma
· HIV/AIDS
· PTSD
· ALS
· Crohn’s Disease
· Parkinson’s Disease
· Multiple Sclerosis
· Chronic debilitating conditions such as Anxiety, Insomnia, Chronic Pain (Fibromyalgia)

marijuana doctor in florida

We prioritize personalized botanical medicine, and tailor the components and dosages to an individual patient’s needs. Art and science of medicine merge.

Cannabis consists of more than 400 substances including 140 cannabinoids such as THC, CBD, CBN, CBG, THCA, terpenes, and flavonoids. Cannabinoids, including CBD and THC, interact with your body’s endocannabinoid system, or ECS. The ECS is a system of receptors found in all mammals. These receptors, CB1 and 2 are located in the brain and nervous system throughout the body.

Cannabis is a non toxic plant with no chance for overdose. Our goal is to optimize your endocannabinoid system and keep your mind and body in balance; rest, digest, retore, and heal.

marijuana doctor in florida

We prioritize personalized botanical medicine, and tailor the components and dosages to an individual patient’s needs. Art and science of medicine merge.

Cannabis consists of more than 400 substances including 140 cannabinoids such as THC, CBD, CBN, CBG, THCA, terpenes, and flavonoids. Cannabinoids, including CBD and THC, interact with your body’s endocannabinoid system, or ECS. The ECS is a system of receptors found in all mammals. These receptors, CB1 and 2 are located in the brain and nervous system throughout the body.

Cannabis is a non toxic plant with no chance for overdose. Our goal is to optimize your endocannabinoid system and keep your mind and body in balance; rest, digest, retore, and heal.

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The process of getting a Medical Marijuana Card in Florida.

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The Endocannabinoid system and the difference between THC and CBD.

How to Get a Medical Marijuana Card in Florida

The first step is to get evaluated by a certified medical marijuana doctor. Only certified marijuana doctors can certify a medical marijuana patient in Florida. The patient must be a Florida resident and have a valid Florida ID or driver’s license. The doctor follows state of Florida guidelines which list qualifying medical conditions, and can also write a recommendation for medical conditions of similar kind or class as those listed. Insurance, medicare, and medicaid do not cover medical marijuana evaluations, or medical marijuana.

After the doctor certifies a medical marijuana patient, basic information is entered into the state of Florida Department of Health Compassionate Use Registry. Information that can identify the patient is entered such as patient name and address. Medical history or diagnosis information is not shared with the registry. A patient number is issued to each patient. Licensed marijuana growers, dispensaries, and law enforcement use the registry to verify valid patients. In the event that you are stopped by law enforcement while carrying marijuana in Florida all you need to do is provide the officer with your registry number to avoid being arrested for carrying medical marijuana.

After the doctor sees the patient, and has entered the patient into the registry the patient is ready to submit the Department of Health form. The Florida Department of Health issues the medical marijuana card directly to the patient. The ONLY valid medical marijuana card in Florida is issued by the Department of Health. Cards issued by other sources will not be honored by licensed growers or dispensary organizations.

The patient can purchase the entire 70 day order at once with 3 refills, or break up the order into smaller orders. Some growers deliver statewide directly to your home. Dispensaries are being opened statewide. Insurance does not cover medical marijuana. Tinctures, capsules, vapes, sprays, patches, suppositories, concentrates and ground  flower are available. High CBD, high THC, or a combination of both are available. Sativa, indica, and hybrid is available.

medical marijuana treatment centers

(CAP) Cannabis-Assisted
Psychotherapy

This helps one open his/her mind to new perspectives, improve motivation, become more engaged and focused in therapy, feel comfortable sharing past traumas, and change repetitive maladaptive behaviors.

Dr. Michelle Weiner collaborates with Cannected Wellness.

"The body doesn’t know the difference between an experience and a thought, you can literally change your biology, neuro-circuitry, chemistry, hormones and genes by simply having an inner experience"
Dr. Joe Dispenza

Endocannabinoid System

"Our Master Regulator"

Your body makes naturally occurring cannabinoids and is biologically equipped with cannabinoid receptors. This network of receptors found throughout the brain and body, plus our naturally occurring cannabinoids and specific enzymes makes up the ECS. This system maintains homeostasis by balancing our neurotransmitters and hormones, making us more resilient to stress. The intake of cannabis into our system, as well as exercise, stress, and healthy nutrition promotes the production of our own naturally occurring cannabinoids.”

Terpenes


The essential oils of the cannabis plant which are the catalyst; they guide the desired effect.

The breakthrough DNA test that matches you with the right cannabinoid products because cannabis is personal!

THC/CBD

The two most prominent and well studied cannabinoids of the cannabis plant.

Cannabis and Cannabinoid ResearchVol. 1, No. 1

A neglected treatment option for opioid addiction: medical marijuana.

Here is a collection of clinical studies, papers and references providing the ultimate resource for medical disorders helped by cannabis.

Pain-Related Therapeutic Benefits of Cannabinoids

Articles

Useful articles about Cannabis

Having trouble getting to the gym? Well if you’re not a fan of overstimulating pre-workouts and expensive supplements in general, you may want to try smoking weed before the gym.

Cannabis has been at the center of one of the most exciting—and underreported—developments in modern science. Research on marijuana’s effects led directly to the discovery of a hitherto unknown biochemical communication system in the human body, the Endocannabinoid System, which plays a crucial role in regulating our physiology, mood, and everyday experience.

High doses of THC are hallucinogenic, and microdosing LSD is a lot like CBD. These mighty molecules can relieve human suffering and act through the endocannabinoid system.

Delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol — a psychoactive but less potent cannabinoid than Delta-9 THC is used to get around Cannabis legalization laws.

Virtual Reality Effects on Pain Perception: Implications for Pain Management

Current Status: Pending

Literature suggests that the use of virtual reality distraction for adjunctive pain control has been successful. In clinical settings and experimental studies, participants immersed in a virtual reality experienced reduced levels of pain, general distress/unpleasantness and reported a desire to use virtual reality again during painful medical procedures.

There has been research into the use of virtual reality distraction for adjunctive pain control with significant success. There has been growing evidence for the use of EEG for the measurement of pain. It has also been suggested that virtual reality could be used an alternative to marijuana and opioids for pain management. Further implications have been seen specifically among chronic pain sufferers. This is especially interesting since there is a reduced risk of addiction as is seen associated with marijuana and opioid use. This study aims to investigate the effect of virtual reality distraction on pain perception.

Additionally, we intend to create a body of open source content for potential use by other investigators utilizing similar tools. 

The intervention has the potential to relieve chronic pain sufferers of their pain with a non-invasive mechanism and minimal risk. The participants may experience a temporary decrease in the perception of pain during the course of the experiment or a distraction from said pain.

Pending IRB approval at UM

Seniors Over 60 With Chronic Pain Using Medical Marijuana

Current Status: Active

 

The purpose of this study is to identify what is effective and safe for older adults with chronic pain to develop an understanding of what educational materials are required for facilitate access to appropriate products at medical marijuana treatment centers (MMTC). 

Survey older adults (> 50 years) with chronic pain who have MM access cards and receive their product from state-approved dispensaries to document: demographic/health data; patterns of use; product specifics; pain effects on daily life; pain-related medical conditions; education prior to MM purchase; helpful and problematic effects of MM use. 

The proportion of Florida’s population that is 60 and older is growing more rapidly than other components of the population. Musculoskeletal disorders with associated chronic pain are a common problem in later life. Symptom management in older adults, including chronic pain management can be challenging (Briscoe, 2018). Medications, especially opioids, can increase the risk of confusion, constipation, falls and injury (Briscoe,2018). Medical marijuana (MM) is often recommended by doctors in the treatment of these medical conditions, guided by state law that defines qualifying conditions.

Medical marijuana use among older adults is growing at a rate more rapid than younger age groups (Lum, et al, 2019). The 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health estimated a 2.9% prevalence of marijuana use among this older population. However, the survey did not ascertain if use was for medical or recreational purposes (Han et al., 2016). Older adults may have important differences in pathophysiology, pharmacological interaction of medications, comorbid conditions, and toxicological responses to cannabis.

There is little evidence to evaluate the differences associated with medical marijuana use among older adults, such as individual reasons for use and problems arising with use (Haug et al., 2017).

Chronic pain is a major public health problem. Approximately 178 million (41%) adults in the U.S. age 18 and older suffer from at least one painful health condition (Nahin, et al, 2019).

In Florida, there are 327,492 medical marijuana card holders and chronic non-malignant pain was the No. 1 diagnosis for which patients are registered (The Florida Department of Health, Office of Medical Marijuana Use, 2020). Yet, it is not a qualifying condition, creating challenges for physicians wishing to support patient use of MM for chronic pain.

Chronic pain accounted for nearly 34 percent of diagnoses at certified dispensaries (The Florida Department of Health, Office of Medical Marijuana Use, 2019).